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Beem

Aermet 100

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4 hours ago, Beem said:

Anyone have experience machining this?  Looks like the machinability is 25-10%.  Any suggestions on tooling that worked well?

https://www.ssa-corp.com/documents/Data Sheet AerMet100.pdf

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AerMet 100 is somewhat more diffcult to machine than 4340 at HRC 38. Hence, carbide tools are recommended at 280 to 350 SFM.

Not all that hard at 38 HRC. I have machined 50-55 HRC with 5-7-9 flute tools all day long with no issues. That have given you the recommend SFM just keep your chip load around .0015-.003 per tooth to start then work up from there. High feed cutters if your doing a lot of roughing are a solid choice just have inspection points if running for long periods of time.

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Thanks for the response.  The chipload recommendation helps.

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1 hour ago, Beem said:

Thanks for the response.  The chipload recommendation helps.

What type of machining will you be doing? Milling or turning? The chip load per tooth was milling. For turning I would be more aggressive for roughing depending on the setup and and tooling being used.

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It's milling for small parts.  I've milled and turned hard steels quite a bit, but with the amount of cobalt and nickel in this material, I would suspect that it's tough.  The info you gave was good and provides some baseline to work off of.

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Its not that hard to machine. I used 1.5% of the tool dia. in total chip load...so a 1/2 mill(6 flute) would be .0075 per rev or .0012 per tooth.  Try for max depth of cut and limit radial doc so as not to break the tool. The material will wear notch at your depth of cut. 

Use tooling designed for Stainless and High temp alloys. Feed mills are real good here. If you'll have long cut times, create transition points and add a M00 to look at the tool for wear. Or Have rough, semi fin and fin mills.

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Is it annealed?  If so it's not bad at all.  If it's heat treated... you need to find a new job.

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