Smit

Best rough milling technique for this applicaiton

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Hi folks, I'm planning to run a part in a way that I haven't really done before so I want see if you guys have any thoughts on this. We've been provided with a couple pieces of 4140 steel, about 45 Rockwell hardness, 11" diameter x 17" long, that we're planning on turning to the shape below. Then we'll mill 3 flats on it at 120 deg apart so it will clamp solidly in a 3 jaw chuck. We'll also put a piece of all thread thru it so we can secure it to the table with all thread. I've talked with Helical tech people and they're recommending a high efficiency tool path with a 3/4", 3 1/4" loc, 5 flute rougher. But they aren't recommending very fast feed rates and it'll take a long time to do it. The Iscar people are recommending a feed mill. with a .025 depth of cut. Either way it's tough stuff and will take a long time.

The picture below is what the set up is going to look like after we turn the the material. It's pretty rigid because it's a big chunk of steel but not much support on top.

image.png.ed5677919b5eac219d2954e9ae572b47.png

 

The below picture is a HEM toolpath picture with a 2 1/2" axial DOC and  .05 radial DOC. Repeat on the opposite side. then on the other 2 sides too, just not as deep.

image.png.df99fd25d11d541cc76b7d49a1f4899d.png

If anybody can share their thoughts on this PITA process I'll be grateful!

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Holding like that is not going to be rigid, no matter what you do

I would flip that part over and fixture it from the big end.

Then I'd rough it with a 2 or 3 inch Ingersoll mid feed face mill

5M5P, 5M6P Mid-Feed Face Mill (ingersoll-imc.com)

 

 

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I agree with Gcode above, using ID jaws clamping in the big bore.

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Sorry I didn't give you guys the whole story.

Unfortunately that bore's going to be gone when the part is done. The only thing I can come up with is very light radial cuts and spending a lot of time on it.

image.png.de41c022f91f0ba80d3f30b0661baaf2.png

 

image.png

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I would go lighter depth bigger stepover with that setup

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15 minutes ago, Smit said:

Sorry I didn't give you guys the whole story.

Unfortunately that bore's going to be gone when the part is done. The only thing I can come up with is very light radial cuts and spending a lot of time on it.

image.png.de41c022f91f0ba80d3f30b0661baaf2.png

 

image.png

I'd still chuck it big side down to rough the  outside 

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Yeah I would have left the diameter big. Rough the Clevis in. The grabbed the Clevis to turn the rough area then finished everything from there. Way you have it makes for a lot of work that if the process were done a little different could have been avoided.

Might think about a sandwich block to hold that lower section fully supporting up to what you need and should be good go from there.

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2 minutes ago, Smit said:

That's a [email protected] looking tool! :yes

They ARE a badass tool.  We've gone to the TG1 style from Ingersoll for most of our feed mills, but there are still some instance where the 5M seems to hold up better.  Not sure why, or when one is preferred over the other, but they're both great, stable tools.  

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12 minutes ago, JB7280 said:

We've gone to the TG1 style from Ingersoll for most of our feed mills

We have a couple of those that we use for DEEP pockets in Ti.   The inserts seem to last forever.  Great tools.

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