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Company policies on vacations


DC CNC
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On 3/3/2022 at 5:19 PM, PAnderson said:

The place I work now and the place before, all managers were expressly forbidden to deny vacation or sick time to people that had it. 4 weeks vacation, 5 sick days and 11 paid holidays. You can carry 10 days vacation forward and 3 sick days. I have never taken more than a week at a time and always carry something forward. But the peace of mind knowing the policy is good is a big deal. Two way trust is huge.

 

Paul

I don't know if our manager is forbidden to deny time off but as far as I know he hasn't denied anyone other than when HR made a rule a couple years ago to only use a certain amount of time during December. I can fill out a 1/2 day vacation form five minutes before I leave with no issue but that would be a rare thing for me. A lot of people will take their full five weeks in 1/2 day vacations. I will usually save three days for Thanksgiving week and 12 days for most of December.

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On 3/6/2022 at 11:17 AM, Bill Craven said:

This was an interesting jaunt down memory lane...

I ran a Moore jig borer back in the 70's for a while until they put me on a SIP Jig bore. (Swiss)   They didn't have digital readouts back then.  It was some kind of illumiated optics.  Super accurate in a  temperature controlled room...

Thermal accuracy:

I shake my head sometimes when I see a young machine tech assembling a machine and holding a spirit level in their hot little hands for too long.  Even Fadal had warnings about shining a flashlight on the tube of a high accuracy spirit level when leveling their machines.

 

There is another company with the name of Moore that makes diamond turning machines.  They can turn mirrors and measure the surface finish in angstroms.  I was contacted by Los Alamos National Laboratories and they wanted to know if Mastercam could hold 6 decimal places of accuracy in it's calcualtions.  Their roughing cuts were .0001s.   They had to have curtains installed around the machines to keep air currents off the machine.  The bases of the machines are thick Granite slabs that 'float' on an air cushion because there is too much "rumble" from the Earth and that was causes bad finishes.  

 

 

Hi Bill,

The "Moore Tool Company" is the same company that made the original Jig Bore and Jig Grinding machines, that now produces these super accurate diamond turning machines. They are the same company, but have specialized in hyper accurate lathes. Which is a shame, because I can only imagine what they could build.

On 3/7/2022 at 4:24 PM, sir Camalot said:

Collin,

What is this book, "Foundations of Manufacturing" that you are speaking of?

It is the greatest book about manufacturing that I've ever read, and recommend it to everybody in the trade, whenever the subject comes up. (I bring it up a lot. Lol.)

https://mooretool.com/publications.html

The book is "Foundations of Mechanical Accuracy", by Wayne R. Moore, 1970

It isn't cheap, but honestly it would be a bargain at 10-times the price...

 

8 hours ago, cncappsjames said:

Maybe thinking Foundations of Accuracy???

The "Moore" book, above. If you haven't read it James, it is worth a gander. I am pretty sure you're at a high enough level of knowledge with the Matsuura training you've done, that it wouldn't be as big a benefit to you, as it is to most people, but there is a lot of great stuff in that book. It is basically > how do we make and measure the highest of mechanical accuracies, and build machines to hold 0.0001 tolerances, without electronic compensation? Well, Moore Tool Company did it by building every component of their manual milling machines to +- 25-millionths, and matched the ball-sets to 10-millionths.

This book is a wealth of information on how to manually measure and produce the most accurate parts.

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We allow it, but frown upon it. They prefer no more then 1 week at a time and only allow so many people from each dept to be out at the same time. Between programmers and process engineers we have 5 people and they prefer to have no more then any 2 of us out at the same time. Same applies to the operators, no more then 2 mill guys and lathe guys at the same time, but no more then 3 total between departments.

We do pay out vac. at employees anniversary date, but prefer not to and don't like more then a week.

Our max vac. time is 4 weeks which takes 20yrs to get which myself and the owner are the only ones that have 4 weeks and I believe one of our process engineers will get his 4th week next year.

We were bought out by another company last fall and all of their facilities are jealous of our vac. The other 12 plants only get 2 weeks/yr after 1yr and they never get any more. Fortunately they allowed us to keep our vac. the way it is.

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On 3/8/2022 at 3:21 PM, Colin Gilchrist said:

 

Hi Bill,

The "Moore Tool Company" is the same company that made the original Jig Bore and Jig Grinding machines, that now produces these super accurate diamond turning machines. They are the same company, but have specialized in hyper accurate lathes. Which is a shame, because I can only imagine what they could build.

It is the greatest book about manufacturing that I've ever read, and recommend it to everybody in the trade, whenever the subject comes up. (I bring it up a lot. Lol.)

https://mooretool.com/publications.html

The book is "Foundations of Mechanical Accuracy", by Wayne R. Moore, 1970

It isn't cheap, but honestly it would be a bargain at 10-times the price...

 

The "Moore" book, above. If you haven't read it James, it is worth a gander. I am pretty sure you're at a high enough level of knowledge with the Matsuura training you've done, that it wouldn't be as big a benefit to you, as it is to most people, but there is a lot of great stuff in that book. It is basically > how do we make and measure the highest of mechanical accuracies, and build machines to hold 0.0001 tolerances, without electronic compensation? Well, Moore Tool Company did it by building every component of their manual milling machines to +- 25-millionths, and matched the ball-sets to 10-millionths.

This book is a wealth of information on how to manually measure and produce the most accurate parts.

The Moore Shop Foreman moved to Florida in the late 90's and worked in my shop. His wife changed positions that required a relocation to Jacksonville and she was making twice what he made so it was a no brainier for them. What he knew about holding tolerances and different tricks wow. I learned a lot from him and glad we worked together.

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On 3/10/2022 at 5:30 AM, crazy^millman said:

The Moore Shop Foreman moved to Florida in the late 90's and worked in my shop. His wife changed positions that required a relocation to Jacksonville and she was making twice what he made so it was a no brainier for them. What he knew about holding tolerances and different tricks wow. I learned a lot from him and glad we worked together.

There is a lot to be learned from people from "niche" shops and specialties.  

 

I noticed in the late 70s that a lot of the old-timers were retiring and there wasn't a lot of new young talent entering the trade.  I was one of those.   During my breaks, I would go around and look at all of the setups and how the old-timers were doing things.  At first, I was resented until they saw that I was just trying to learn.  Then it got a little bit better.  Like Mr. Paris, I bounced from shop to shop to learn what the niche was in the new shop.  I recognized that these old guys, that weren't going to be around forever, had a wealth of knowledge, especially about fixturing and being methodical on sneaking up on tight tolerances. 

 

CNC has changed so much of that knowledge.  A friend of mine calls the young programmers Nintendo programmers.  They are good with computers but haven't ever actually cranked a handle.  It used to be at CNC Software that everyone in the company would take a turn in the lab doing a little handle cranking.  

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I get five weeks holiday a year (excluding statutory holidays), and ten days sick leave.

If you take more than two days sick leave in a row, you have to provide a doctors letter.

Our holidays and sick days roll over each year, up to a certain number (can't remember the number).

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