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What kind (# of axis) of CNC machine would I need to make this ?


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Needs a helix machined to accept 3 spring coils (screwed on, so it needs to be machined precisely)

So width ranges (3 models) 48mm, 70mm &  81mm

Currently made of either 4140 or T6061 T6 (customers choice)

Hole from the top to accept a 1-2" shaft also

Any model recommendation would be appreciated 

End.jpeg

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2 hours ago, Justmerighthere said:

Try this IGES file of an older version 

TSC06-02 Keyway.iges 661.93 kB · 4 downloads

8 hours ago, #Rekd™ said:

Without seeing all the details a C-Axis Lathe could likely do this.

C Axis lathe with some cheating Y Axis lathe would be a better choice. Question becomes how many do you need to make? Would a Sub Spindle make sense to allow 100% complete part off the machine? Would a 2 or 3 turret machine make sense? With a 3 turret depending on the material 45 second to 1-1/2 minute part. Part of that rope thread is not machinable up to the shoulder on this sample.

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The thread has had a "gutter" added between the last thread and the shoulder of the hub as a "machine/tool exit" as a spring with a ground end is being screwed onto it but I have been told its too fine to try to get the thread up to the very end of the hubs shoulder.

As for 1 operational pass Im not sure, but Id like to keep the holes uniform across all the production if possible

As for numbers Im looking at setting up shop in the US as supply chain issues out of asia is ridiculous (freight more than anything due to FJB insane fuel prices means small jobs are now no longer economical 

So Im trying to figure what machinery I need (second hand to start) to get this going here

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2 hours ago, Justmerighthere said:

The thread has had a "gutter" added between the last thread and the shoulder of the hub as a "machine/tool exit" as a spring with a ground end is being screwed onto it but I have been told its too fine to try to get the thread up to the very end of the hubs shoulder.

As for 1 operational pass Im not sure, but Id like to keep the holes uniform across all the production if possible

As for numbers Im looking at setting up shop in the US as supply chain issues out of asia is ridiculous (freight more than anything due to FJB insane fuel prices means small jobs are now no longer economical 

So Im trying to figure what machinery I need (second hand to start) to get this going here

We call the gutter a thread relief or a groove. Get a hold of a MTB and have them quote you a turn key on something like this. We offer that service, but only with the machine purchased and we are helping you get up and running. Problem we run into is different options or configuration not done correctly that adds time that customers think we should do for free that out of our control. 

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21 hours ago, Justmerighthere said:

The thread has had a "gutter" added between the last thread and the shoulder of the hub as a "machine/tool exit" as a spring with a ground end is being screwed onto it but I have been told its too fine to try to get the thread up to the very end of the hubs shoulder.

As for 1 operational pass Im not sure, but Id like to keep the holes uniform across all the production if possible

As for numbers Im looking at setting up shop in the US as supply chain issues out of asia is ridiculous (freight more than anything due to FJB insane fuel prices means small jobs are now no longer economical 

So Im trying to figure what machinery I need (second hand to start) to get this going here

 The other issue you will find, is that used machinery holds good resale value. There isn't much difference between new/used equipment, unless you go really old, and then you will have issues with finding parts and someone to repair the machine when it goes down. And, it will go down.

I have lost count of the number of people I've helped over the years, and friends I've known, who go down the used machine route, and spend all their time trying to keep the machine running. At the end of the day, used machines are slow, so you're going to find really quickly that it takes 3-5 times as long to make a part with old machinery, versus a new machine.

Who are you going to get to train you on an old machine? Who are you going to get to setup, program, and specify all the tooling you will need to make these parts?

If you opt for a new machine, you can bundle the whole machine, and all of the tooling, fixturing, programming, and training, into a single monthly bill, and have someone come in, program everything, do all the hard work of developing the whole process, and end up with a machine that cuts your parts, quickly and accurately, which essentially becomes a printing press for dollar bills, when done right.

If you are a talented machinist, who knows machines and controls inside-and-out, and you've programmed, setup, and ran dozens of parts, then sure, go ahead and buy a used machine, scrape together the tooling, and write the G-Code program by any means necessary, just to get something going.

Do you want to be in the machine shop business? From what I'm hearing you say, your end goal is just to source parts cheaply and quickly, without having to deal with an overseas supply chain. If that is the case, I'm 100% positive you can find a machine shop here in the United States of America, who can produce these parts with the speed and economy you desire. The won't be "as cheap as doing it yourself", but I don't think you really understand all the things you need to successfully run a machine shop which cuts metal. You don't just buy a used machine, plug it in, and "presto", out comes your parts.

I'm not trying to come off as condescending here. Just speaking from the heart, and from decades of hard-won experience, seeing people get into the industry without ever having worked in the industry.

If you are still undeterred, and want to make your own parts, then welcome to the brotherhood of manufacturing professionals, and I wish you the best of luck in the pursuit of your dreams.

By the way, full disclosure, I work for a Machine Tool Distributor, who happens to sell the most economical brand of machines on the planet (and the largest MTB also); Haas Automation. Where are you located? I'd be happy to pass along your information to someone who can truly help. No hard sell, ever, just someone who can provide another perspective and offer options.

This part would fit great on a Haas ST-40 Lathe, with Y-Axis, Bar Feeder, and a Parts Catcher. You could 100% automate the process with minimal operator interaction, to simply load bar material, and remove finished parts from the Parts Catcher when complete. This could be done turnkey, so you can get up and running very quickly, and still have the flexibility to either program new parts yourself, or contract someone to program, setup, and prove-out your new parts.

That part is 100% achievable on a Y-Axis Lathe, including the Broaching...

 

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