BenK

.036 Rib .62 deep

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I have a part that has a .036" rib .62" deep and 8.00" long any suggestions on how I should approach it? Material is 6061.

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rib meaning .036 thick and .62 tall? If so, use a small diameter cutter (to reduce load) and take thin finish cuts. If it's supported on the ends if won't be too much trouble.

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I have a part that has a .036" rib .62" deep and 8.00" long any suggestions on how I should approach it? Material is 6061.

Any draft?

if not I would cut it with a saw cutter if possible.

or EDM or grind it

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If you are talking about machining the rib into a block, you should rough the rib til about .250" - .300" thick. Then start at the top and step down doing a rough pass then a finish pass, 4 to 1 I think is the amount. I will have to double check when I get to work, but I do quite a few parts that have .05" thick walls about an inch deep 6" long with a .5" endmill at 120ipm. So for your part you would start at the top of the rib and rough then finish with a step down of about .075" - .100" maybe even less at the top if your rib runs a little thick.

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No draft and it's not supported on the ends.

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No draft and it's not supported on the ends.

 

 

Another good option would be to use a small dia endmill and contour ramp. It would be like single pointing it all around. That would keep the load very low.

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I would rough it to about .125 thick and then step down about .125 using a relieved .25 dia 2 flt endmill till I was at depth. The endmill should have about .15 length of flute.

 

Then using a relieved .1875 dia 3 flt I would finish the .036 thickness down .125 deep using .010 passes on the walls with a final pass on each side of .005 now step down and repeat until at final depth. The endmill should have about .15 length of flute.

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+100 on the ramp. Leave it .125 thk, and then ramp down maybe .015 per depth, but mill radially to finished size. Theoretically, it should be supported by the stock all the way down

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i would use a combo of the above post. .250 3fl car em relive it to .200 dia and back to .650 leaving only .100 of the act cutting flute. step down from top to btm .050-.075 with a rough and finish pass on both sides at each level. we cut them up to 10" long 1.5 tall and .030 wide often.

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On smaller cutters keep the stepdown to less than 10% of the cutter diameter. I also agree with using ramp. I would rough it out with a ramp leaving .002-.003 and finish it with a contour.

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On smaller cutters keep the stepdown to less than 10% of the cutter diameter. I also agree with using ramp. I would rough it out with a ramp leaving .002-.003 and finish it with a contour.

 

Didn't realize you said .62, will probabaly have to edm it.

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Sharp Sharp Cutters,

High Speed Machining,

Thin Wall Machining:-

RF

RF

RF

RF

RF

RF

RF

RF

Rough and Finish as you go down.

If You use 2 different tools, it leaves the Finisher tool intact!...better.

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+100 on the ramp. Leave it .125 thk, and then ramp down maybe .015 per depth, but mill radially to finished size. Theoretically, it should be supported by the stock all the way down

 

This has been my approach in the past R/F then step down

I was stepping down .075 but the rib was .05 thick X .875 tall X 2 long

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Thanks for all the suggestions. I ended up leaving tabs and making a fixture to bolt it down to.

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