kunfuzed

First time in A286

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Long story short, getting about one cutter per part. Removing maybe 16 cu inches of material, if that's any sort of helpful metric. Basically just roughing a grab rib with a raptor dovetail on it (sorry the video doesn't show the whole thing) Anyways, used an Optirough set to HEM, at 200 sfm, .0012 chip load, at a factor of 2.67 yielding 4000rpm at 120ipm. 2x Dia step down at 7% step over for a 1/2" GARR V4-R.

 

Should I be getting better tool life, or is that just the nature of the beast?

 

What other cutters, or parameters would you recommend? I think I'm pretty close to man specs.

 

https://youtu.be/oKxPrEQ0POo

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Side note... there's about a half inch of material that could have been sawn off before heat treat.. lol

 

I think it's around 35rc... not really sure though.

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Try a OSG exocarb. Run it dry.

You will be surprised how long it lasts.

 

I find Garr"s wont hold up as good as they say they will.

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we cut alot of this nasty stuff

 

large DOC small WOC 

Niagara stabilizers are incredible with simply a blast of air 

 

stay miles away from carbide insert tools, the heat generates simply melts the inserts even in SFM as low as 100-150 

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stay miles away from carbide insert tools, the heat generates simply melts the inserts even in SFM as low as 100-150

 

Yeah, I noticed. Terrible tool life.

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Run it dry and see what the tool life difference is.

Tried that. Had hopes for it, but about the same. The air blast was supplied by the operator and an air gun, and it wasn't a brand new end mill, so it may have had a few things going against it.

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anything 3/8 and under= coolant, and lots of it.

big depth and lite radial.

 used an 1.25" dia HF on an aero. clevis in a lathe. Seemed to work well dry. Coolant was roughly equal, IIRC.

still beat up inserts faster than any tool steel.

didn't run enough parts to get any kind of exhaustive test, grain of salt.

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Tried that. Had hopes for it, but about the same. The air blast was supplied by the operator and an air gun, and it wasn't a brand new end mill, so it may have had a few things going against it.

 

Are you using any 12 or higher flute tools?

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use a decent cutter, not Garr ! Best cutter I ever used on this stuff was a silmax HM118 a few years back. Not sure if they are available where you are.

 

also looks like you have the cutter in a sidelock holder, which will equal run out and bad cutter life due to one flute working harder. try using a high precision collet style holder - Albrecht ones are great.

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Are you using any 12 or higher flute tools?

No.  These are 4 and 5 flt.  I thought high flute counts were pretty much just for finishing?

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use a decent cutter, not Garr ! Best cutter I ever used on this stuff was a silmax HM118 a few years back. Not sure if they are available where you are.

 

also looks like you have the cutter in a sidelock holder, which will equal run out and bad cutter life due to one flute working harder. try using a high precision collet style holder - Albrecht ones are great.

I will see if the boss will let us try some different cutters. I would really like to.  Our supplier likes to push Garr, so that's what we  have, and they stocked up on a bunch of them...

 

Yes that was an EM holder, but we also do have an Albrecht APC-14 (love those) holder we were running the ones with no flat in.  I was under the impression that at these relatively slow spindle speeds an EM holder would be fine, but could obviously be wrong.  Unfortunately no better luck with the milling chuck.

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use a decent cutter, not Garr !

There is nothing wrong with Garr endmills, as long as you buy the right style.

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No.  These are 4 and 5 flt.  I thought high flute counts were pretty much just for finishing?

 

Was my thoughts also, but on hard metals where you want tool life the 4-5% step over with the correct chip load per tooth is pretty amazing what you can do. We had one project where we saved many hours using these tools verses inserted or even the traditional 4-5 flute endmills. Yes the endmills are not cheap, but with the saving with one customer and the part per day requirements it came out much cheaper and more productive than previous methods and efforts.  

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Wow, that's not a bad price for that 1/2" 7 flute.  $100 give or take.

 and they outrun about anything else in hi temp alloys 

 

i tried about any endmill available here and i never find anything comparable for price vs performance

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Wow, that's not a bad price for that 1/2" 7 flute.  $100 give or take.

I just got some 7 flute duramills @2/3 that price.

nice slippery coating.

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First thing I notice is a solid holder with set screw, I prefer TG series for superior vibration dampening and grip strength with

shorter projection than a milling chuck.  It sounded like it was vibrating a little to me.   Jason

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