Sign in to follow this  
Cory M. Pio

O-ring Boss Port Question

Recommended Posts

Guest

I use porting tools when presented with  this feature

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Never tried......if it was a standard port, there was a tool available some where

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never tried......if it was a standard port, there was a tool available some where

yeah, 

 

just figured someone out there might be doing it for 5 pc. orders to save on tooling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't do it. Don't do it. Let me see if I can make myself clear don't do it. Whoever didn't cover the tooling needed for the job needs to call the customer and add that cost to the job or give it back to the customer. That port is extremely hard to mimic and is best done with the correct tool. Any failure of the port will become the responsibility of your company. If this is going into a flight application and the aircraft crashes and they trace the damage back to the failed port your company made because they cheaped out and didn't get the correct tool your company and the supervisor who approved it will be liable. If it is R&D part and your company has to assume no responsibility for any issue that might arise from the port not being to the correct specifications laid out by the standard them by all means surface machine it, but really consider getting the correct tool for the job and do it the right way.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^^ +1

 

add to it the AS standard has a surface finish requirment...that aint happening without a STANDARD port tool.

 

dont do it. don't do it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't do it. Don't do it. Let me see if I can make myself clear don't do it. Whoever didn't cover the tooling needed for the job needs to call the customer and add that cost to the job or give it back to the customer. That port is extremely hard to mimic and is best done with the correct tool. Any failure of the port will become the responsibility of your company. If this is going into a flight application and the aircraft crashes and they trace the damage back to the failed port your company made because they cheaped out and didn't get the correct tool your company and the supervisor who approved it will be liable. If it is R&D part and your company has to assume no responsibility for any issue that might arise from the port not being to the correct specifications laid out by the standard them by all means surface machine it, but really consider getting the correct tool for the job and do it the right way.

 

yeah i figured something like this...

 

i already bought the tool because this is a test lot and we probably get more. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah i figured something like this...

 

i already bought the tool because this is a test lot and we probably get more. 

 

Wise move sir!!!!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done it many times for 5-10 pcs jobs. We have some porting tools, but for larger ones I draw them up and 3D profile them.

We don't do stuff that is aircraft or NASA, so liabiity isn't too much of a concern, as long as it functions correctly.

Have yet to have one returned as faulty in over a decade. (knock on wood)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Done that before.  But we always inspect it on an optical comparator.  Either by cutting one in half  or by taking a cast of it with dental impression material.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done it many times for 5-10 pcs jobs. We have some porting tools, but for larger ones I draw them up and 3D profile them.

We don't do stuff that is aircraft or NASA, so liabiity isn't too much of a concern, as long as it functions correctly.

Have yet to have one returned as faulty in over a decade. (knock on wood)

 

 

I've done it quite a bit myself.  Speaking of surface finish, you may not even get the call out with a port tool.  Be careful and always check your port tool in a piece of dummy stock.  Not to mention a hit or two on them gives the super sharp edges a bit of hone or wear in and makes them run better.  Especially in 4140 and P20.  In my humble experience any way.  Also, you only want to spotface it with the larger diameter.  I usually rough the spotface with an endmill to about -0.008in or so then run the spotface to -0.01in.  Most specify a max depth only so if you only go so deep you have a chance or two to save the spotface surface finish.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the bigger issue with milling a ms33649 style port is the milled finish NOT having a circular lay pattern. Under pressure the oil could seep/fail due to surface finish and o-ring seal.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did some on our lathe that were fittings to be welded into place. BenK helped me with the final design.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tools every time except on a couple of times (prototypes) where we turned them.

Smallish manifolds for air data - drilled the pilot on the mill and used that to clock the position in a 4jaw on a cnc lathe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Join us!

eMastercam - your online source for all things Mastercam.

Together, we are the strongest Mastercam community on the web with over 56,000 members, and our online store offers a wide selection of training materials for all applications and skill levels.

Follow us