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Paul Felger

Turning rare Plastic Matl.

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Material type is carbon graphite resin impregnated.  It is compression molded and sintered for 3 months at 1200 deg.

That is all know about it.  Received some samples on this stuff, one pc is about 1" OD and the other is 5/8 OD.

It was recommended to use diamond tooling to turn it.    Order quantity is 60K for two different parts.

Any experience with this material would be greatly helpful.  I will post for info once I receive it.

Thanks 

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And a BIG vacumn. Its going to get into everything, The dust that is.

Where a mask when blowing it off.

You will need to run it dry.

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And a BIG vacumn. Its going to get into everything, The dust that is.

Where a mask when blowing it off.

You will need to run it dry.

What about ways and ball screws?

Not talking a 20 off batch here. I would have thought 60k parts will most likely kill the machine?

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3 months at 1200 degrees??? Holy crap!

Is this common?

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Good point on the ways and screws.  If your machine isn't designed for graphite machining you'll have to retrofit it to deal, or consider the machine scrap at the end of the run (if it makes it that long).  Maybe positive air pressure under the way covers?

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3 months at 1200 degrees??? Holy crap!

Is this common?

 

That's what I was thinking. To tie up a furnace for three months for batch of material is very costly. What end use would justify that kind of cost. I am very curious now. 

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That is weird. Shell was the only tne making a epoxy for space apps. IT could handle the cold and heat of space.

And yes, the ball screws will take a beating, along with the bearings. Sop keep a eye on the tolerances as you run.

MOST IMPORTANT, DONT BREATH IT IN. IT WILL CAUSE PROBLEMS LATER !. ITS GLASS. NO DIFFERENT THEN BREATHIN IN VOLCANIC ASH.

THATS THE xxxx THEY DON'T TELL YOU ABOUT!!!

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I call BS on the 1200deg for 3 months; not sintering anyway; crystal growth possibly.

 

Sounds like this material:

 

Metallized Carbon Corporation offers machineable, resin impregnated, carbon-graphite blanks for companies that need to machine mechanical seal primary rings, radial bearings, thrust bearing, case wear rings, or pump vanes on an emergency basis. The machineable blanks are made from fine-grained, high strength, molded carbon-graphite that is fully impregnated with chemically resistant, thermal setting resin. The material has excellent lubricating qualities when running in low viscosity liquids in the temperature range between -400°F and over 500°F. The blanks are readily machineable with conventional tungsten carbide or diamond tools. Mechanical seal rings, bearings, and vanes machined from these blanks are impervious to high-pressure liquids. The material is dimensionally stable so that mechanical seal ring faces can be polished to one Helium light band flatness, and the flatness is retained indefinitely. The material is chemically resistant to almost all liquids except extremely strong, oxidizing acids and alkalis. Forty-nine standard cylinder sizes are available to cover mechanical seal ring and bearing sizes up to10-15/16 inch outside diameter by 3-1/8 inches long. Blocks 4-5/8 inch wide by 8 inch long by up to 2 inches thick are also available. Two different Metcar, machinable, blank grades are kept is stock to cover a wide range of applications. Those grades include Metcar® Grade M-400, for general duty applications (CS Series Blanks), and Metcar® Grade M-106, for high load, high speed applications (HS Series Blanks). About Metallized Carbon Corporation Since its inception in 1945, Metallized Carbon Corporation has been manufacturing high-quality, dependable bearing solutions for severe operating environments. 

 

 

 

 

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turned pure carbon once and won't do it again , was horrible to work with , dust everywhere , could not touch the part with bare skin , it was a mandrel for producing chemistry beakers for a lab .

 

had to machine it dry as well it could not get wet in any way or it would explode when put in the autoclave or what ever contraption they where using to produce the parts .

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60K parts of any fine particle material containing graphite will cause serious issues with any machine. I sure hope they took that into consideration when quoting. Okuma and many other machine tool manufactures offer a graphite package as an option on many of the machine models. This will double up on the seals and wipers as well as adding extra protection for the spindle bearings. As everyone else is saying, health concerns are also a major issue. Make sure you have some type of HVAC filtration system in place as well as a full face mask. You don't want the fibers getting into you eyes or lungs! It will only be mildly irritating at first but serious health issues will arise many years down the road.

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