Sign in to follow this  
oneyankfan1

Ever Use These Before?

Recommended Posts

No, but I wish I'd had those vises for this job I'm about finished with.

 

Looks really handy for the right application. 

 

Any ballpark pricing on the vises anyone?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are getting the demo from the 2014 IMTS, so we are getting it for around 12,000. The original price would have been around 26,000. That is for the 500mm 2 face tombstone. We are also getting the induction blocks. I am putting these small cast iron plates on there to face and drill. Im going to be using ceramic inserts on a sandvik 345 facemill and a walter drill, so I will be getting VERY aggressive with the cut. I will update and let you know how it turns out. Ill put pics up also, asap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used magnets before. Major problems were rehashing chips and part moving. Had enough success, I would try it again.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use them every day.

 

Give me a bit and I'll show you some in use. We have 4 of various sizes in the shop.

 

But if a warning tho, from the top as in a 3ax mill you'll never move the part but from the side like in a 5ax on B90 you'll push it all over. It's easy to cure tho, I made stops out of brass so I can move them while it's on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My powers of detection tell me this was not just a IMTS demo, ill be kind, its slightly used. Should work fine though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Used them about 15 years ago making giant manifolds. Work great.

 

I agree with the issue of chips sticking but I completely disagree with the part moving around.

If your part is moving, it's because you didn't design your work holding correctly.

 

You need to either mill a recess in the blocks to prevent shear forces from moving the part or add something simple like Mitee-bites. Don't blame the magnet, blame the design.

 

Expect to pay a lot for a good magnet. These things are not cheap; and if they are cheap, you'll pay in the future... ;)

 

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what the brass stops are for.

 

It's not practical to mill the pads in our shop. We don't run any production and we'd go thru the blocks like crazy. But yes, some sort of work stops for side work.

 

Chips packing never really bothered me, I'd turn it off, blow the chips away, power it back up and keep running.

 

 

Speaking of those blocks, we found it cheaper to make our own vs buying them.

 

Just don't lay your mitutoyo absolute calipers on it.

 

Trust me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just don't lay your mitutoyo absolute calipers on it.

 

Trust me.

 

Oh come on I want to try. Please can I try that? :scooter: :scooter: :scooter:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe the machinist a few feet down has a pair you can try  :devil:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe the machinist a few feet down has a pair you can try  :devil:

 

1990 I went to work in a tool and die shop as an apprentice. I was cutting this stringy materiel on a on Lebond lathe. I had a 5" Micrometer on the Cross feed to check my sizes. Chip whips and brushes next to the micrometer. The owner of the micrometer saw this and told me they just become mine. I checked them to standard and everything and he said if I was that careless to leave them there no telling what I did to them and I had to replace them. $185 later he got a brand new micrometer and I got his old one. I gave it away years later to a person getting started in the trade and shared that story with him.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I remember a coworker telling me a story once of his time at another shop. A guy had used the edge of some nice calipers as a scribe. The boss apparently didn't like that. When confronted the guy said something like, "What do you care? They are my calipers." 

 

"Yeah? Well they are measuring MY parts!"

 

Not sure what happened afterwards but the moral of that exchange has always stuck with me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I remember a coworker telling me a story once of his time at another shop. A guy had used the edge of some nice calipers as a scribe. The boss apparently didn't like that. When confronted the guy said something like, "What do you care? They are my calipers." 

 

"Yeah? Well they are measuring MY parts!"

 

Not sure what happened afterwards but the moral of that exchange has always stuck with me.

 

I was taught to do that at Dunwoody in the 90's.

 

Get some of these just for the purpose:

http://www.shars.com/6-dial-caliper-with-carbide-jaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the first part I put on it. It is a cast iron cover plate. There is a .001 flatness call out on this part, we have MANY parts we are going to do this on. We are .0002 flat on all parts. Im running a sandvik facemill at 500 ipm, and it didnt move a bit. I did machine a pocket in the shape of the part .375 deep and it works like a charm. We are going to purchase 3 more of these.

post-46368-0-70654200-1471615874_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

My boss started the go pro about 1 minute 50 seconds early. The drill shown will be running 1000 psi through spindle coolant, hence the fan at the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its the way the Okuma processes the canned cycles. The way to fix it is to replace the G80 with a rapid call to your retract plane in the canned cycle, I just havent had time to go back and fix it yet, its a mad dash to get EVERYTHING on our fastems. It works, it keeps the spindle turning throughout the entire tool run. It really freaked me out when we got these machines. :sick:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using a Technomanete 18"x30" for a few months now. Thanks to Del for the lead.

 

One thing i might do different is spring for the higher density pole configuration. more poles= more clamping and more costly investment.

I've had several parts move out of hundreds produced. First you need to know how hard you can push the tools and how far you can let the inserts wear before you'll have a problem.

 

 A reamer was just finishing up last week and my wife says; "hey is it supposed to do that?!?!?!?'

reamer took a dump because one of the pole extensions moved.

damaged reamer pulled the part off the magnet.

lucky the part fell off before the tool change :realmad::crazy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Join us!

eMastercam - your online source for all things Mastercam.

Together, we are the strongest Mastercam community on the web with over 56,000 members, and our online store offers a wide selection of training materials for all applications and skill levels.

Follow us