average_jonny

Toolpath for machining a fillet without a form tool?

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So I come from a Powermill background but my current place uses Mastecam which I've been self learning over the past five weeks. One thing I can't seem to get working and no one at my place has any new ideas, is machining a fillet without a form tool, or a tool smaller than the fillet itself. In Powermill there was a toolpath called 'Optimised constant Z' , which is equivalent to Mastercams waterline, however OCZ would maintain an equal stepover even as the geometry angle changes. The closest toolpath I've found is flowline however it breaks the toolpath at some corners as seen in the attached capture, I've also attached the file so you can see for yourselves. 

Any ideas on the best way to go about this?

 

 

1.JPG

Test_piece2.mcam

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Waterline with "extra passes in shallow areas" enabled would work just fine too. If you are just learning Mastercam, just try to stick with the high-speed toolpaths. Once you learn them well, they will cover most every job you do. The old legacy toolpaths work in many cases too, but why waste your time learning old techniques.

Carmen

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7 minutes ago, Redfire427 said:

Waterline with "extra passes in shallow areas" enabled would work just fine too. If you are just learning Mastercam, just try to stick with the high-speed toolpaths. Once you learn them well, they will cover most every job you do. The old legacy toolpaths work in many cases too, but why waste your time learning old techniques.

Carmen

Sorry sir but I disagree. Surface Finish Contour and Flowline are still superior in many instances to the newer HST Toolpaths IMHO.

Surface Finish Contour is what I think you looking for to cut this that tool and get

image.png

 

 

 

 

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Blend might also be worth a try as it is good over multiple surfaces (even if they are not particularly well trimmed together).

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Many options will work but I prefer is KISS application

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Surface high speed waterline works well

Set Steep/Shallow to 366.45/362 and you are good to go

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31 minutes ago, average_jonny said:

Thanks guys, but could you possibly upload this again as a.zip as my work computer doesn't have a .rar extractor.

Here is zip file

Test_piece2-mod.zip

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Flowline or 2D swept.  I still use 2d swept a lot , much cleaner tool motion, and more control as far as where it starts and ends.

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And my reseller told me that I was the only one that uses 2D sweep. :whistle: Gives good clean code without a lot of retracts and easy to program.

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28 minutes ago, Elmer Fudd said:

And my reseller told me that I was the only one that uses 2D sweep.

It sounds like your reseller doesn't know what he's talking about.

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30 minutes ago, Elmer Fudd said:

And my reseller told me that I was the only one that uses 2D sweep. :whistle: Gives good clean code without a lot of retracts and easy to program.

Probably younger guy, doesn't know how to program without surfaces.  I started on MC 4, MSDOS based.  Had to fire it up from the command line.

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45 minutes ago, AMCNitro said:

Probably younger guy, doesn't know how to program without surfaces.  I started on MC 4, MSDOS based.  Had to fire it up from the command line.

Yep, MC 3.1 here.

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I would tool change to a ball end mill and be done with it :whistle:

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The old wireframe Swept would make a tiddies path for that too.

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My Turn! I read many years ago about using a "tool boundary" perpendicular to the cutting direction with Surface Finish Contour.  It helps maintain a constant stepover relative to the  chain, a bit like Scallop or Flowline.  Take a look at the attached file and look at the containment boundary I used.

Test_piece2_RT.mcam

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13 hours ago, Rich Thomas 4D Engineering said:

My Turn! I read many years ago about using a "tool boundary" perpendicular to the cutting direction with Surface Finish Contour.  It helps maintain a constant stepover relative to the  chain, a bit like Scallop or Flowline.  Take a look at the attached file and look at the containment boundary I used.

Test_piece2_RT.mcam

Wow thanks for the tip! I learned a lot in this thread... I usually would do a flowline for something like this, but struggle keeping the tool down sometimes..

Thats my one gripe with mastercam, I have used other softwares that are just much easier to produce a clean path. But I don't believe them to have quite as much "flexibility" that mastercam does. 

I just need to learn more of the ins and out with mastercam. I just get too complacent with what I know and how i can make things work, but I know there is much better ways out there..

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I've never seen this.  Having said that, if you completely remove the containment you get basically the same path.  I don't see what this containment is doing.  I'm going to have to play with this one more.

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On 11/29/2019 at 3:56 PM, Rich Thomas 4D Engineering said:

My Turn! I read many years ago about using a "tool boundary" perpendicular to the cutting direction with Surface Finish Contour.  It helps maintain a constant stepover relative to the  chain, a bit like Scallop or Flowline.  Take a look at the attached file and look at the containment boundary I used.

Test_piece2_RT.mcam

Big thanks Rich, this looks very tidy and to be seems to be the less convoluted way.

On 11/30/2019 at 10:05 PM, jlw™ said:

I've never seen this.  Having said that, if you completely remove the containment you get basically the same path.  I don't see what this containment is doing.  I'm going to have to play with this one more.

Without the containment boundary the stepover towards to the bottom of the fillet becomes exponentially larger, with the boundary it has the reverse effect. Attached two captures of with and without to show this.

1.JPG

2.JPG

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On 11/29/2019 at 10:56 AM, Rich Thomas 4D Engineering said:

My Turn! I read many years ago about using a "tool boundary" perpendicular to the cutting direction with Surface Finish Contour.  It helps maintain a constant stepover relative to the  chain, a bit like Scallop or Flowline.  Take a look at the attached file and look at the containment boundary I used.

Test_piece2_RT.mcam

Would you possibly be able to create a version of this file that can be opened in MC2018 or lower?

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