Matthew Hajicek - Conventus

Compensation Poll - Take the poll

I think your compensating for something.  

436 members have voted

  1. 1. Which comp type do you use?

    • Wear comp only
      268
    • Control comp only
      46
    • Some of each
      92
    • Never use comp
      24
    • What's comp?
      6


Recommended Posts

Haven't used "control" in ages!  I worked at a shop that used exclusively and I remember making myself enter all the tool diameters, including drills and reamers, because that was the only way I could make sure I didn't miss one.  Since that shop I have worked only with Haas machines and I program with wear only.  Only problem I have is that the Haas doesn't like lead in/lead out with only radius, it needs to go in straight then radius.  I wonder of "control" would help with that...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok, first time post on this forum, but i always use control. a co-worker tried to get me into wear, but i guess it goes back to caveman programming days. today, i was looking at wear assuming that i will wonder wtf, why, all these years ive wasted. but he did say to watch out with old programs, because you get so used to not putting in an offset.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use wear but at my old job I used neither.  The owner didn't believe in cutter comp.  All adjustments made were by the programmer and the program reposted.  This is one reason why I refer to it as my old job.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/10/2018 at 5:08 AM, Tinyfxds said:

I use wear but at my old job I used neither.  The owner didn't believe in cutter comp.  All adjustments made were by the programmer and the program reposted.  This is one reason why I refer to it as my old job.

Wise move. ;)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

didnt understand the benefits of wear until yesterday. used 2d chamfer, 5/8" hole using a 5/8" spot drill. a wall was really close so i put the depth at .275" with a .0125" chamfer. in the verify the tool didnt smoke the wall, was nice to see the chamfer in the verify too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎10‎/‎20‎/‎2017 at 1:04 PM, kunfuzed said:

Wear.

I did work at a shop years ago that did something that seems odd now, they would program finish cuts with wear, but roughing cuts with computer.

I guess is a preference issue. I like to do exactly that, only because I don't like to see the G41 or G42 everywhere but only where is needed. So If I see a G41 or G42 then I know it is a finish pass.

In any case with the machinist we are getting now it is safer to use computer or wear.

Also and as a mater of fact many programmers don't know the difference between the compensation choices.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my shop, wear only.

We did a lot of setups and while we had standardized tooling in the tool changer, I didn't want operators inputting dias in the offset page,  because if one of those guys screwed up,  crash...

Also we tend to interpolate a lot of holes.  Wear lets me do that with a lot smaller leadin.  So I can put a larger tool in the bore.  

Also,  someone mentioned caution when running old programs.  We NEVER saved programs back from the machine. Always post fresh code.  Always

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been at existing shop since fresh out of trade school for 23yrs and been programming for them on and off for 10-12 of those years and typically I only use control. For roughing it depends on the cutter. If it's an inserted tool I typically use computer comp as the tool diameter doesn't change, if we're using endmills whether it be a knuckle cutter or standard e.m. I use control so operators can adjust size on the fly.

Every mill I've ever run has only ever needed .0001/.0002 more then the radius of the tool (all of our machines are set up for CDC not CRC) to comp. tool so the .001/.002 moves some guys say is the reason for using wear or computer is a moot point. Unless I'm in a real tight space I'll just type in 55% in MC comp amount and go.

As an operator it was always nice to be able to look at a program and know exactly what feature is being cut without having to know the size of the tool the program was done with, which is probably the main reason we still do it this way.

JParis and I have had a couple discussions over this when he worked at a reseller and he would try to convince me of changing.

When I 1st started working here (in '95) and took over programming the 1st time ( '97-;98) roughing and finishing tool paths were the same, the operator just added .01 or so to diameter of tool in control to leave material on for finisher. When Mastercam added backplot (on my 2nd or 3rd time in programming seat which I think was when X came out) and each face changed color when it was cut by a tool I realized the number of times I would miss machining a feature because I forgot would be drastically reduced I started using the leave stock on feature and the operator could just insert the actual tool diameter which saved a few scrap parts as well if they forgot to add to diameter offset.

I like the thought of using the G10 code to automatically fill in tool table, but it would reset the diameter on every part and the fact that the same tool numbers aren't always used would pose a problem and we try to keep the operators from editing a program because we usually hire just that operators.

I have never run in to a situation where wear was needed so I see no reason to change, but I would like to see a few examples where it had to be used would be a learning moment for me.

Later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, dragracer1951 said:

We NEVER saved programs back from the machine. Always post fresh code.  Always

Careful with this.  Though as long as you don't use reference points, this is generally safe.  If you do, then you will want to have the recover nci data on file open checkbox turned off in the configs, so that you get a fresh NCI regen after opening, then you won't be missing reference points.  Instead of posting fresh code each time you run the job, just keep a library of "proven" posted code, when you make changes in MC, overwrite the "current" file so you library is up to date and push it to the machine.  When the job is done, delete the file from the control, but leave on the server or pc you transfer from or where you posted the code.  I have been burned by reference points just not deciding to post many times over, usually with no monetary cost other than time, but a couple of times it has been expensive.  Single blocking code is unacceptable 99% of the time.  I am now in the habit of manually checking my posted code each time, or just using point moves instead (far more reliable - but time consuming).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wear  at 100% for toolpath who have tool compensation,

form experience, mix Wear and Control is a time bomb for a major crash 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never use comp of any kind, computer only. I can change the size of the tool, post it and have it back to the machine before the operator can find the buttons for the tool register.

That way when I backplot I really know where the tool is going save for psop/peof.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/24/2018 at 10:23 AM, JAMMAN said:

I never use comp of any kind, computer only. I can change the size of the tool, post it and have it back to the machine before the operator can find the buttons for the tool register.

That way when I backplot I really know where the tool is going save for psop/peof.

200 to 2000 miles away and 50 different machine and our customers I will stick with comp. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I was doing work for you and you wanted to use comp then I would use it. I have not found a need for it personally.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too bad can't change my answer. Previous shop was control, new is wear. Would not go back to control.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/5/2018 at 12:53 PM, SlaveCam said:

Too bad can't change my answer. Previous shop was control, new is wear. Would not go back to control.

Ya me neither after using it, what was I thinking. slowly converting all my programs to wear now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use several of them... not sure how anyone can get away with only using one style of comp.

I use wear mostly... but when I change contour type to "ramp" and "plunge" a zigzag path to rough a wall or something, I change to computer... and then when I do lettering I switch it to "off" so it mills the lettering on centerline.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Reko said:

I use several of them... not sure how anyone can get away with only using one style of comp.

I use wear mostly... but when I change contour type to "ramp" and "plunge" a zigzag path to rough a wall or something, I change to computer... and then when I do lettering I switch it to "off" so it mills the lettering on centerline.

 

yes...  computer, wear and off.. I never never ever use Control

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would prefer to use Wear for comp at the control.  I think it's understood we all use computer and off.  I thought the pole was specifically for comping tools at the control panel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/15/2018 at 8:43 AM, gcode said:

yes...  computer, wear and off.. I never never ever use Control

Wear on mill.

Off and CONTROL for wire.😎

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a firm believer that when a job starts to really wear on you the best way to overcome is more compensation. 

  • Like 4
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i see a lot of people use wear, might be a dumb question but what if using a certain size end mill then run out of them and have to switch to a different size?

ive been using control. im guessing this is just for mill also?

what about lathe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, middy73 said:

i see a lot of people use wear, might be a dumb question but what if using a certain size end mill then run out of them and have to switch to a different size?

ive been using control. im guessing this is just for mill also?

what about lathe?

No regrinds here....we may use a different length but don't change programmed sizes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, middy73 said:

i see a lot of people use wear, might be a dumb question but what if using a certain size end mill then run out of them and have to switch to a different size?

ive been using control. im guessing this is just for mill also?

what about lathe?

If you go to a different diameter endmill then you'll need to change speeds, feeds, stepovers, stepdowns, etc., and you won't know for sure if it will gouge or crash until you've re-verified with the new cutter.  May as well change it in CAM and re-post.  If it's a regrind only a few thou different you can probably get away with it and just comp it in, but any cut not using comp will leave extra stock, and that may mess up your finish passes.  This becomes significant when your 5/8" endmill measures .575", in addition to the fact that now you're using a weaker and more flexible cutter than what you programmed for.  Using a different cutter than what's on the setup sheet is a big NO in my book.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost always use computer (no comp).  Alternatively I will use Control.  I program SCM (Routech/Morbidelli) machines.  They don't play well with wear comp for whatever reason.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Join us!

eMastercam - your online source for all things Mastercam.

Together, we are the strongest Mastercam community on the web with over 56,000 members, and our online store offers a wide selection of training materials for all applications and skill levels.

Follow us